Longest English words and their definitions

I decided to write this post because I have nothing better to do right now (this is better than school, right? or is it considered school? I’ll ask mom). I wanted to write a post about something completely unrelated to any post I have ever done in the past, and I was contemplating what the subject should be. The word antidisestablishmentarianism (I didn’t look this up, I know how to spell it) popped into my head, and I thought “Maybe I should write about long words!”, so I did some research on Wikipedia (as I always do for everything) and found a few really long words that you should learn how to spell so people think you have a big vocabulary (you probably have a big enough vocabulary already, but I’m going to expand it by about .0003 or less).

 

1: Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (definition link)

This word was invented in 1935 and means  “an artificial long word said to mean a lung disease caused by inhaling very fine ash and sand dust.” (from the Oxford Dictionary).

 

2: Antidisestablishmentarianism (Wiki page)

This word is the longest non-coined English word, at 28 letters long (29 if you add a p, but who would do that?). It was the movement that opposed the disestablishment of the Church of England as the state church (this sentence was taken from Wikipedia). So it’s kind of like a double negative.

3: Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia

This one is my favorite. It simply means the fear of the number 666. Just totally random.

 

 

Also, did you know qua is a word? Next time you’re playing Scrabble, Take Two or any other word game, and you have a Q, an U, an A and a R, use the Q, U and A to make qua (discard the R). Another useful word in Scrabble or Take Two is gi. It means a karate training uniform and is very useful if you have an extra I you need to get rid of.

Thanks for reading my completely random post that may or may not be useful in your life (who’s going to ask you if you know how to spell Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia?). I hope you liked it, thanks again for reading.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s